Washington State Institute for Public Policy
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November 2016
The 2016 Washington State Legislature created the Education Funding Task Force to make recommendations to the legislature regarding the state’s program of basic education. To inform the Task Force’s work, WSIPP was directed to contract with an independent consultant to collect and analyze K-12 public school staff compensation data. The consultant’s final report examines the amount and uses of compensation paid in addition to basic education salary allocations, market rate salaries, and potential local labor market adjustments. The report is in PowerPoint format as submitted to the Task Force on November 15, 2016. The technical appendix provides additional detail on the data collection and analysis methods.

The consultant provided data files containing supplemental pay information submitted by school districts. The files are organized by staff type and can be downloaded by clicking on the relevant link below. The files have been consolidated, cleaned, and standardized from the original submissions. Employee names and certificate numbers have been removed and replaced by a unique research identification number. A description of the data collection process can be found in the report and technical appendix.
September 2016
The 2016 Washington State Legislature created the Education Funding Task Force to make recommendations to the legislature regarding the state’s program of basic education. To inform the Task Force’s work, WSIPP was directed to contract with an independent consultant to collect and analyze K-12 public school staff compensation data. The analysis must examine the amount and uses of compensation paid in addition to basic education salary allocations, market rate salaries, and potential local labor market adjustment formulas. The consultant’s interim report describes the data collection process and analysis plans for the final report, due November 15, 2016.
Download: Interim Report
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July 2016
The Washington State Institute for Public Policy's (WSIPP) Board of Directors approved a contract between WSIPP, the Department of Health, and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction to evaluate outcomes and conduct a benefit-cost analysis of the GRADS program.

GRADS is a K–12 program for pregnant and parenting teens that focuses on helping students take on the "dual role" of student and parent and prepare them for the world of work. In this evaluation, we compare teen mothers that participated in GRADS to a group of similar teen mothers from districts that did not offer the program.

Based on the results of our analysis, we estimate that GRADS participants have a 10.6 percentage point higher rate of high school graduation by age 22 and a 6.5 percentage point higher rate of postsecondary course enrollment by age 24.
Download: Report
Related:
July 2016
Washington State provides funding to school districts to help underachieving students through the Learning Assistance Program (LAP). The 2013 Washington State Legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy to prepare an inventory of evidence-based and research-based effective practices, activities, and programs for use by school districts in LAP and to update the inventory each two years thereafter. This report describes the third update to the inventory of evidence-based and research-based practices for use in LAP.
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July 2015
Washington State provides funding to school districts to help underachieving students through the Learning Assistance Program (LAP). The 2013 Washington State Legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy to prepare an inventory of evidence-based and research-based effective practices, activities, and programs for use by school districts in LAP and to update the inventory each two years thereafter.

This report describes the second update to the inventory of evidence-based and research-based practices for use in LAP.
Related:
December 2014
The 2013 Washington State Legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) to conduct an outcome evaluation of Washington State's early childhood education and assistance program (ECEAP). The program provides educational instruction, as well as family support and health and nutrition services, to preschool-aged children from low-income families.

WSIPP developed a statistical model to determine whether attending ECEAP had any impact on student academic outcomes. We found that ECEAP has a positive impact on third, fourth, and fifth grade test scores. This is our final report for WSIPP's 2013 legislative ECEAP assignment; to view the initial report click here.
Download: Report
September 2014
Washington State provides funding to school districts to help underachieving students through the Learning Assistance Program (LAP). The 2013 Washington State Legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy to prepare an inventory of evidence-based and research-based effective practices, activities, and programs for use by school districts in LAP and to update the inventory each two years thereafter.

This report describes the updated inventory of evidence-based and research-based practices for use in LAP.
Related:
July 2014
Washington State provides funding to school districts to help underachieving students through the Learning Assistance Program (LAP). The 2013 Washington State Legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy to prepare an inventory of evidence-based and research-based effective practices, activities, and programs for use by school districts in LAP and to update the inventory each two years thereafter.

This report describes the initial inventory of evidence-based and research-based practices for use in LAP.
Related:
January 2014
WSIPP updated its 2007 analysis of the research evidence regarding full-day kindergarten. Over half of Washington’s public school kindergarteners attend full-day programs, and the state is expanding funding for this option. In this report, we analyze average impacts on student outcomes from full-day kindergarten across the United States and elsewhere. We also examine whether benefits are likely to exceed costs.

To investigate, we conducted a systematic review of research by collecting all studies we could find on the topic. We screened for scientific rigor and only analyzed studies with strong research methods. We identified ten credible evaluations of full-day kindergarten’s cause-and-effect relationship with student test score outcomes. The studies estimate the relative impact of full-day in comparison with half-day programs.

Improvement in standardized test scores was the only outcome measured in the studies that we reviewed. Other outcomes of interest such as social and emotional learning and high school graduation have not been examined consistently in the research literature.
Download: Final Report
Related:
January 2014
WSIPP analyzed how various approaches to early childhood education (ECE) for low-income children impact student outcomes and whether benefits exceed costs. We examined three types of programs: state and district pre-kindergarten, the federal Head Start program, and “model” programs.

To investigate, we conducted a systematic review of research by collecting all studies we could find on the topic. We screened for scientific rigor and only analyzed studies with strong research methods. We identified 49 credible evaluations of whether the three types of ECE for low-income children have a cause-and-effect relationship with student outcomes. The studies in our review measured academic as well as social and emotional development outcomes; a few studies also measured longer term outcomes including crime and teen births.

To view the final report for WSIPP's 2013 legislative ECEAP assignment, click here.
Download: Full Report
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P O BOX 40999
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360.664.9800
institute@wsipp.wa.gov